This place called home

  • This place called home
  • This place called home
  • This place called home
  • This place called home
  • This place called home
  • This place called home

This place called home

Like the travel notebooks of Bruce Chatwin, whose writings offered an incredibly sensitive and humanistic vision of an Australia forever lost, the photographic wanderings of Matt Wilson – another Anglo-Saxon globetrotter – provide ineffable images of the different countries he has traversed. Few in number and extremely unique, these modest photographs take contemporary photography head on. Even framed, they are so small in format, they demand viewers to stop and scrutinize the details, much in the manner of a mini-painting filling a seventeenth century cabinet of curiosity. In that same way, they often seem somewhat damaged, as if corroded by the outdated film the artist uses. The visual result is opalescent: the very visible grain and decadent light outline areas of intimate shadows in nocturnal scenes and offer a smoky, misty rendering in daytime landscapes. This studied technique of the possibilities of antiquated emulsion accompanied with a keen vision represents the core of Matt Wilson’s language. As a result, what you see is tripped and a poetic sway is set in motion. This visual structure gradually informs an incidental narrative that reveals fictional lands on the cusp of a lucid dream.

Released
27/10/2014
Collection
Hors Collection
Format
250 x 220
Anglais/Français
Relié couverture cartonnée
52 photos colors
96 pages
ISBN : 978-2-35046-335-3
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Matt Wilson

Photographe

Born in 1969 in Tonbridge (Kent), this British photographer living in New York is surprisingly way to capture the light, as if she belonged to him personally. It is represented in Paris by the gallery Girls Calvary, and exhibits in the Mois de la Photo 2014 Hobbies photography in New York in the late 1980s While he is passionate about this medium, it forms to become a professional photographer. But after years of assistantship, he prefers a carpenter to preserve the photograph of any economic issue. Meeting.